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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
business. >>> coming up, is the end of tax-free online shopping near? we will present both sides of a hot debate that could impact your money. first, a look at how the international markets closed today. >> when you buy items over the internet, do you pay taxes on them? apparently a lot of us don't, there's no legislation that is aimed at making sure that everyone pays up no matter the state they live in. and a vote could come this week. we are in washington with more of the very controversial legislation. so, who is behind this move on collecting more sales tax? >> well, it's a good question. it's something the retail industry has wanted to do for more than a decade, make sure that internet vendors collect sales tax for products sold online. the united states senate is taking up a bill that would allow states to collect sales taxes from us of state companies. >> there's some items where consumers are price sensitive and online retailers that do not collect sales taxes can under ku cut can the brick and mortar retailer by 10% because of the situation. >> that ends up for big money for har
a pre-tax profit margin of 17. %, she said she would revisit those goals for the pretax profit margins for that unit in mid year once, again, the final acquisition or the last leg of that brokerage unit has been completed. the year over year decline in fixed income commodities and currency trading was down 42%. she said it was due to the very strong first quarter of 2012. that was due to some hejs that had helped put on for its clients. however, she did note on a quarter over quarter basis trading was up. retail activity among the brokerage clients was strong in january and february. it did taper off a little bit in march on concerns about some of the issues we saw. cyprus the big run-up in the market, et cetera. april got off to a slightly stronger start as well. she said ceo confidence when it comes to m and a, she said right now ceos are looking out to the second half of the year. there is concerns about the profit outlook there and that's holding them back a little bit. debt and equity underwriting remain strong. >> thank you, mary. a lot of information you had from that conversati
at $400 a share. it's got more than $100 net cash even after paying taxes, so you're paying $3,000, any earnings down 25% from what's expected. he put a ten p-e on that and this is a very cheap stock unless you believe that earnings will decline every year from here on out. that's ahead of the case and we're not buying ahead of it because we like the position that we have, you know, but we think it's an exceptionally cheap stock at this level. >> it will be one of the most-watched numbers of the quarter. thanks so much. >> thank you. >> switching gears, they were grossly negligent in the lead up to the brokerage firm's collapse. kayla tausche has more on this story which she's been following from its earlier days. >> it seems like it's been forever, david. we're getting a 61-page lawsuit from the bankruptcy court in manhattan. it takes aim at john corzine and the coo and cfo breaching fiduciary duty as it entered a downward spiral in 2011. it seeks an unspecified amount in damages. trustees won approval for a liquidation plan. in a statement, trustee louis freeh says attempts at med med
have a worry about the consumer and tax refunds will start coming now. credit conditions support employment and certainly consumer staples look very expensive. >> what about utilities up 19% so far this year? utilities are up 16% and health care up 19%. is your money safe in there? will they continue to hold up? >> we've been overweight utilities so i'm not going to be too uncomfortable with that and that's improvement with natural gas prices and in health care it's been very much about dividends and that we saw reimbursement rates that were supposed to be cut recallier this year, and i think it's too late to be on the healthcare bandwagon. >> sectors like materials which have not been with the rally and do you think some of the underperforming sectors will catch up? >> we are worried about materials still and we have to be careful in the u.s., chemicals are 20% metals and mining and look at the s&p 500 materials sector. europe is a big problem for chemical companies and even though they have shale gas as a feed stock, the problem is 20%, 25% of their business is probably going t
. >> yeah, it has, which is good because that may counteract the effects of the payroll tax high. what about gold? let's check the commodities like gold, the ten-year. down about 7%. 7 bucks to $1414. there's been a bit of a move in sort of the euro. we want to keep an eye on that. there's your currency chart here in the ten-year treasury note. we talk about home sales. you always want to watch the ten-year treasury note. the yield right now is at 1 o.66. in corporate news this morning, japan says final permission to resume flights on boeing's dreamliner, it may come as early as thursday. that's earlier than expected. yesterday, boeing's engineers began install b reinforced lithium ion batteries on all nippon airways jets. some investment banks that have been looking to sell businesses with liquid assets in order to appease regulators and bolster balance sheets. credit suisse cited the rule last summer as a reason for exploring that sale. also, a u.s. trade panel has ruled apple didn't violate a google patent to make the iphone. if it had been found guilty, the tech giant's popular devices c
it deducted directly from their earnings through a withholding tax. david: okay. >> that would be easy way. david: come here with zero but with creative powers and eventually pay off. >> terrorist issue i think is an important one and of course we wouldn't change the rules on that. anybody coming into the united states would have to pass the same screens that they pass now as well. so, you're not going to just let someone come in here because they have $50,000 but you know, the same problems that plague us right now with people coming in for free wouldn't be any different under this system. you've got to do a good job of enforcement and you know our officials do a pretty good job of enforcement that wouldn't be solved or exacerbated by selling the slots. david: ed lazear, always thinking out of the box. great to see you, my friend. former chairman. council of economic advisors. >> thank you. david: great to see you, eds, thanks. >> thanks, david for having me. liz: this story has gotten bigger and bigger even though the markets were able to come back. first cbs, now the associated press an
bags at check out. that doesn't sit well with some. >> i feel they are already getting money from taxes that they charge you. they charge you for everything in the world. and i just think it's an added cost. >> they are messy. people throw them everywhere. they do plug things up. i would like it to be cleaner for my grand kids. >> now according to san mateo county health system, californians use about 20 billion plastic grocery bags every year. that is why a growing number of communities all across the bay area are putting similar bans in place in an effort to offset all of the cleanup costs. as we bring you back here live here in san mateo county they are really trying to launch an education effort and get people used to this new bag ban. you can see they have a sign posted here at the entrance to the store. and in many case there is is a store that will hand out reusable bags for free. we are live this morning in belmont alex savidge ktvu channel 2 news. >>> time now 5:38. sal, we're just talking about you know forgetting the bags. do you bring your bags your reusable bags? it's a guy
. you've heard that the first quarter was tough. probably payroll tax impacted more than anything else. and small business is -- and big business for that matter is totally the flux with the obama care act and what it all means. and business is looking at part-time, that you've got to keep people under 30 hours. they don't want to employ more than 50 people. and nobody really knows how this thing is going to work. now, as far as the japanese yen, every major manufacturer in the world has made a strategic decision to produce where they sell. no manufacturer can deal with the volatility in exchange rates. and if you look at where the japanese are today compared to 10, 20 years ago, there is no comparison with let's say 80% produced in north america. so the exchange rate has been dramatically reduced as a factor in our business. and at the moment, i don't see any impact. >> okay, mike, $42. we've been friends a long time. you couldn't tell me at four bucks that that was something i should -- actually, we're not allowed to do it, anyway, but you couldn't have mentioned that back in 2008 or
to have the same enthusiasm for paying taxes for the education of its college students today than it had during the cold war. >> anybody else? back in the red shirt in the middle here. >> one of the kingpins of hollywood, more behind the seasons, was lou wasserman who seemed to helped his forces to some political efforts. what was his leanings? was he considered to be a lefty, righty, or just a pragmatist. >> the question is about lou wasserman and his political lengs. -- political leanings. richard? >> lou was seniorman was essentially a man defeated to the welfare of universal pictures. that's what he did and how he defined himself. it seems to me that wasserman was in a certain sense value neutral so long as whatever was happening worked to the benefit of his studio and his enterprise, and it was a vast enterprise by the time it was -- it reached full maturity. i don't think he was -- i don't think he was evil man. he was just a guy really tending to business in a very, very, i must say, very effective way. there's no question in my mind at least, that he was the weeding ontrip -- the
talk to in the medical device field is worried about the affordable care act, the tax on medical device makers. how significant is that in your view? >> i think there's a couple ways. first of all, the fact that more patients are going to get access we think is a good thing. it's unacceptable that patients are either uninsured or underinsure. tax, yes, it has an impact. we've got to make sure it's done in a responsible and reasonable way. overall we're convinced that it's going to continue to be about innovation, about strong customer partnerships. and really when you think about now, our medical device business, particularly our orthopedics business, our size and scale, the growth opportunities here and very much so in emerging markets. so, for example, all surgery is really just about trauma surgery in emerging markets. it's not as planned. as a result what we're seeing is significantly better growth rates in some of those places. >> i love that emerging markets part of the story. because you just look at the growth numbers and you figure out what the story is. but are you going to ha
up to $300,000 in annual tax revenue. neighbors in the area expressed concern about how more air traffic and noise levels would harm them but the mayor insisted that signature and the other jet companies will adhere to the curfew in place from 11:30 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. we talked to an airport official about the howl and how they will -- how they will benefit and how the airport needs the money. we'll bring that to you coming up in the next hour of "mornings on 2." janine de la vega, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> coming up next -- the senate prepares to take action on the issue over gun control. how the votes are stacking up for extended background checks. and what california dianne feinstein said on the senate floor years ago. >>> this year's host of the oscars. he's now at the center of a controversy tied to the boston marathon bombings. >>> 30s, 40s and 50s on the low. it's clear for everybody. windy for some. highs today warming up. a lot of 70s, low to mid. temperatures will continue to warm up. >>> we're getting word of delays at sfo. the airport says flights to and from o'hare int
be another one of those. but you have had the payroll tax increase go into effect. you've had sequestration go into effect. you have no growth in people's incomes. that was the more disappointing numbers out of the last unemployment insurance report. and if people don't have money, they can't spend money. and finally, we're being affected in the slowdown in europe in particular and the slowdown in the emerging markets. our export growth has fallen to about zero at the moment because there isn't demand overseas for our products. so it feels like a little bit of a soft spot, but we'll see. >> how much of this is consumer confidence, do you think? >> consumer confidence definitely plays a role. but consumers right now don't have the money to spend. and if they went out and spent, they'd be borrowing money. i don't think -- i think it's a more fundamental problem in a way than consumer confidence. >> steve, my long wait yesterday trying to get up to new york, in the lounge was tim geithner waiting for the flight, as well. i asked him, we're seeing these good signs in the economy, how much of it
she brought the tax rate from 83 to 40% and dealt with the labor problem as katty said and she made enormous progress. and, by the way, everyone who blames her for the crisis in 2008, you know, in between margaret thatcher and 2008 there were three or four british prime ministers and then now david cameron. none of them reversed the system. as someone said a minute ago, everybody bought into the system and i think -- so i think her legacy is incredibly positive. the last point i would make she had the right idea about europe and why britain should fit into europe. >> she was right about britain. all these years later it cost her her job but she was right about europe. >> we will be following the funeral service under way right now throughout the morning. martin bashir, thank you. we will see you at 3:00 eastern time on msnbc. >> thank you, martin. appreciate it. >>> coming up next, the gun background check bill is on shaky ground as it heads to a vote today in the senate. will it break down its chances of passing? next. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. at tyco int
where you get this increase in volatility after tax time. and you see all the companies revising their earning forecast to temporary expectations. and so typically in the next month or two we'll have some external macro surprise that will get everyone concerned again. it's been a very consistent pattern that we do well in the fall and the early spring and then cool off and get more volatile. >> rick santelli, markets all waiting for these earnings reports this week. in the meantime among your markets, gold has bounced big today. the dollar is still flirting with 100 yen. what are you watching? what are the benchmarks you're keeping an eye on this week? >> well, you know what, i think the biggest benchmark that i'm going to pay attention to is the dax stock index in germany. it's down about 1.75% on the year. last week not only were eurozone car sales, registrations off, but germany was off in particular. i think keep it simple. i think as those auto numbers deteriorate, it's just going to exaggerate all the other weaker economies. and when you get the imf admitting that austerity
a phenomenal house in houston, no taxes, great unemployment, we've got a great house in coronado, small but fabulous, and better unemployment, 5%. okay? but i have to tell you, how do you overlook the fact that one house is 4,400 square feet in houston and the other house is only 1,000 square feet. >> that's a huge difference. >> yeah. >> so between the english manor or the cozy cottage, the winner is? >> the english manor. >> because of the size? >> exactly, it's livability. really, a thousand square feet is tough to live in. people do it, i've done it, but it's tough. >> real estate really coming back. >> this has all been real estate porn all day. >> real estate porn, all right. we will leave it there. i don't know exactly what that means, real estate porn. do you want to explain that real quick? >> people love to watch real estate. >> they do, that i get. >> and porn. >> yeah, that's one of the most successful things on the internet right now. >> exactly. always a fabulous guest and winner, dolly lenz. >>> up next, make or break for apple. the technology giant out any minute now. we
,000 and 20,000 people left a lot of trash behind. since there was no organizer for the event, city tax payers have to pay for it. >> big bucks there. >>> a warm start to the week but how long will it last. steve paulson will tell us when to expect a cooldown. >>> and check this out. a young boy a very horrifying close call with an alligator. we'll tell you how he was able to survive. >>> it looks like we have some slowing on southbound 101. this may be due to an earlier crash near candlestick. we'll give you the update straight ahead. [ male announcer ] enjoy delicious chicken made the way you say at subwa. with our oven roasted chicken, now a $3 six-inch select. make it your own with melty monterey cheddar or creamy ranch. and during april, the black forest ham is also a $3 six-inch select. subway. eat fresh. >>> a south florida boy is lucky to be alive after he was attacked by an alligator. he and his father planned to go canoeing off boynton beach. he wandered to the edge and an alligator bit on the right side of his body. >> grabbed my arm. i couldn't get out. >> i'll punching the alligat
happened in waco. one more quick note about the timing. yesterday was tax day for everyone in this country but here in boston it was patriots day which commemorates the battles of lexington and concord, the start of the u.s. revolutionary war. big day not only for the country but boston. >> what was supposed to be a celebration turned out differently. let's go back to new york and savannah. >> matt on monday evening president obama spoke about this tragedy offering his thoughts and prayers to the city and vowing justice to those involved. i happened to sit down with him shortly before these explosions and we talked about a number of things in the headlines. we began with the gun legislation before congress that many say is now hanging by a thread. >> i think we've got a good chance of seeing it pass if members of congress are listening to the american people so let's just take the example of background checks. 90% of americans think that we should make it tougher for criminals or people with serious mental illnesses to obtain a gun, and so the notion that congress would defy the overwhelmi
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)